Got a knack for talking into a mic?  Hoping to land your own station some day?  If you believe you have what it takes to break into radio broadcasting, you’ll have to get your feet wet and start building up your resume.

Listen Closely

According to the experts at Sanford Brown, a good rule of thumb is to listen carefully to each of the stations you’re able to tune into and see which ones have a weaker signal.  There’s a good chance those that are weaker are locally owned.  Since most stations are operated by large, major parent companies, you have a better chance of getting your foot in the door at these instead.  Start small and ask if there are any internship opportunities available, even if unpaid.  This will help build your resume so you can be well-positioned for the bigger opportunities to come.

Attend Career Fairs

Those held at broadcasting schools are your best bet.  Often, stations snatch up hungry interns at these events, and you’ll likely have an opportunity to meet with several all in one place.  You don’t always have to be a student to receive an invite, either.  Update your resume and be prepared to pitch your point.  If you’re believable enough and have what it takes to be a voice to the public, you’ll either get an offer on the spot or receive a call back right after.  Take any chance you get to network and pass along your resume.

Try College Stations

Most colleges and universities have an on-campus radio station that broadcasts student-oriented news.  Pair an internship at the station with a broadcasting degree or simply walk-in and try to get involved in any way possible, including taking positions on or off the air.  Get involved with College Broadcasters, Inc., the largest organization for college radio.  This will provide a multitude of resources for how to break into the field.

Once you have some experience under your belt, you can try out for larger, more visible opportunities.  You may even be able to get your own show or have the ability to work alongside some big names in entertainment.  And, who knows – you could decide to make the transition to television broadcasting.

Are you the next weekend weatherman?  The next sportscaster?  Or, are you hoping to go the talk show route?  Hey, even Howard Stern, Ryan Seacrest, and Oprah had to start somewhere!